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What to do if a class is full

A class I want is full! How does waitlisting work?

Our department does not have any control over waitlists, but the Franklin College registration help page has good insights about how waitlists work. You have to be prepared to check your email frequently during registration. Waitlists are not a guarantee of a seat and they get purged a few days before each semester starts. Click here for more information, under "other registration hacks."

The 4000/5000-level class I want is full but I see there’s another section of it in the 6000/7000 level. Can I just take that one?

No. Undergraduates should not be attempting to register for any classes beyond the 5000-level, as 6000-9000 level courses are for graduate students. Undergraduates may wish to take graduate-level courses in some specific cases (Honors, Double Dawgs), but will almost always be taking coursework intended for undergraduates. If there are several unused graduate-student-level seats in a course that has run out of undergraduate seats, sometimes a professor will be willing to reduce the number of grad seats and replace them with undergraduate seats, but that cannot be guaranteed or individualized for a particular student.

I need a required class for my major, I'm graduating soon, and it filled up too quickly! What do I do?

Contact Dina if it's one of the required courses, in case we can add more seats or another section. This is not a guarantee, but if we know that we have a lot of seniors needing something that's required but full, sometimes we can make room for seniors. If it's an elective, Dina can help brainstorm other courses to take.

 

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